Interfaith dating muslim

That was the first year Pew studied whom Muslims married, and it’s one of the only organizations to do so.Muslims intermarry less often than other faith groups with longer histories in the United States, such as Catholics and Jews, but they do so more often than Hindus (10 percent) and about as often as Mormons (17 percent), according to a 2007 Pew study.Unlike the Jewish refugees from Eastern Europe, most of these Muslim immigrants, the biggest groups of whom arrived in the 1970s, were from the middle and upper classes and came for a university education.Some planned to return to their countries, but as the political situation at home deteriorated, a large population settled here.Now, about 30 percent of Jews are married to someone outside the faith.American Muslims are going through a similar transition, one that could profoundly change the Muslim experience in the United States.

A majority of Muslims quietly go along with it, some have a lot of questions and some are ready to quote verses from Quran and make declarations that they are out of the pale of Islam. According to Pew, 2015 might be the year of the religious “nones,” as those who do not identify or affiliate with any faith tradition are on the rise, while the number those who call themselves “Christian” is declining. Dana Trent, MDiv While Christianity is American’s most popular religion (70% of people in the U. identify as such), pastors and scholars all let out a collective gasp at the latest findings from the Pew Forum Religious Landscape Study.Trends in the decline of Christianity’s dominance and the rise of interfaith marriage might indicate shift towards a more open and progressive American spirituality.But, it doesn’t take much Googling to uncover advice against the modern paradigm of the “nones” and blended faith families.

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